A short story on the history of the Cherokee seal and flag

 
In this story on the Cherokee Nation seal, this Picture was taken from a hand drawing of an old photo of the original Cherokee Nation Seal by Robin Mayas. The interpretation of the design of the Cherokee Nation seal is found in Cherokee culture and history. The seven-pointed star in the center of the seal represents the seven Cherokee clans (Bird, Wild Potato, Deer, Long Hair, Paint, Blue and Wolf). The wreath of leaves and acorns surrounding the star represents the sacred fire of the Cherokee, maintained for hundreds of years by spiritual leaders. Surrounding these elements are the words, Seal of the Cherokee Nation, followed by Tsa la gi hi A ye li in the native tongue, meaning Cherokee Nation. The Cherokee syllabary, invented by Sequoyah is used. The date September 6, 1839, represents the signing of the first Cherokee Constitution after removal to Indian Territory.
                          
 
Second picture is the Seal of the Cherokee Nation that was adopted by law of the National Council, and approved by Lewis Downing, Principal Chief, on December 11, 1869. The imprint of the seal was used on official Cherokee documents as provided by law, including the original Flag of the Cherokee seen here! And it was displayed as the official Cherokee flag until  the close of the Cherokee government at the time that Oklahoma  became a State in 1907. The original manuscript of the law providing for the Seal of the Cherokee Nation is preserved on display in the Museum of the Oklahoma Historical Society.
Each of the original  paintings of the official  seals of the Five  Civilized Tribes were done as a contribution to the Museum of the Oklahoma Historical Society in 1940, by Mr. Guy C. Reid, of Oklahoma City.  see pictures of Five tribes seals see them @
http://digital.library.okstate.edu/chronicles/v018/v018p357.html a good historical read for facts on the Cherokee flag!

Each of the  paintings was designed from the imprint  of the original  seals preserved in the office of the  Five  Civilized Tribes Agency at Muskogee, and checked for accuracy on the available  Indian laws  describing  the seals, notice the star pointing up. A picture of this seal hangs in the lobby by the Restaurant of the Cherokee, at the complex today if it hasn't been moved.
 
The fourth picture is the first Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma Flag which contains the Cherokee Seal in the middle along with seven stars in the outer field and one black star. 1979, is when the first Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma flag was commissioned, adopted and raised for the first time, had this same seal in the center with the seven pointed star turned upside down. when Ross Swimmer kicked the UKB out of the tribal complex, he commissioned a Navajo to design a new flag, the orange  flag they fly at the CNO headquarters. The Navajo artist had no idea about Cherokee culture, he turned the star upside down and changed the Oak leafs to some tropical leaf of some sort, the black star memorializes the Cherokee lost on the trail of tears.
The Eastern band Cherokee figure into the seal deal as well, from the time Swimmer had the seal redone, the Eastern band in NC took it an made it their seal as well their phony history claimed it was adopted by the Cherokee in 1839...Then in 2001 a year after Robin Mayes and the UCN made the the origional seal shown up above their official seal, and it was posted on the NET, the EBC took the UCN design and made them a seal, and it is found on their official web site today as pictured below on the flag. In the beginning in 2001 they took the ucn seal an turned the star upside down like Swimmer did as you can see here Then I guess they done a little research and discovered the UCN had it right,  they turned it back over,  produced this flag with the seal and the star positioned properly  and claim it was their Cherokee seal from 1870, but the complete lie is glaring from the seal itself, around the seal it Says "Eastern Band of the Cherokee Nation" There is no Eastern band of the Cherokee Nation, they are simply an eastern band of Cherokee Indians in North Carolina, absolutely no different than the United Band of Keetoowah Cherokee Indians in Oklahoma (UKB), just a few years older, and this lie needs to be corrected.
 
Then to further prove one point of the star should point up, the Keetoowah put the seven pointed star with the oak leafs on their seal and flag as it should be by fact of Cherokee culture, as seen here and where ever they need to fly their flag.